Home Drinks and Beverages Adventure Food: Baby Mice Wine for the wild feel

Adventure Food: Baby Mice Wine for the wild feel

The Origin: Korea or China

The cuisine

The Baby mice wine comes from the ancient Korean cuisine. It is much debated however, that this wine, also considered to be a health tonic, could have had originated from China as many Chinese consume the baby mice wine along with several other wines which include snake wines, etc. And although the characters on the bottle in the picture shown below depict chinese characters, the majority number of people speculate it to have originated in the Korea where the natives consume it as a traditional health beverage as well as a health tonic which cures several ailment and has numerous benefits.

Baby Mice Wine

The wacky tinge

So what is so special about the baby mice wine that gets it into the segment of adventure food? Well, it is sure made up of baby mice! Would not you reckon it to be a reason enough that gives it that wacky tinge? Well, many might be turned of by the very idea of trying out the baby mice wine itself. But so does the mere idea of trying out several delicacies such as the balut (from the Philippines), the escamoles (from Mexico), pacha (from Iran), etc turn several heads off! Pretty justifiable enough to categorize it as an adventure food with that wacky tinge, I suppose.

So the big question arises: the taste! Well, it tastes “aweful” as quoted by many food adventurists. Some describe the taste as raw gasoline and some describe it to be the same as the crushed ant soups of the Thai cuisine! Yet, not more than just two to three glasses of this bizarre drink can get you high. Isn’t it exciting enough for a food adventurist to just dig through the internet, find a place to order this drink from and just try it, whatsoever?

Ingredients

If you are thinking of preparing this wine at home, we give you a heads up by asking you to pull up your sleeves and socks to start looking for and catching some new born mice. The warning is that the mice, if not selected carefully could contaminate your drink. Plus the selection has to be so precise that the mice could not be more than 2 – 3 days old with no fur developed and their eyes still closed. The safest practice is to rear them and selectively pick them under expert guidance.

Besides 10-15 baby mice, you require rice wine (which is a Chinese alcoholic beverage made from fermented rice) to further ferment the baby mice and carry on the brewing process.

Process

The best thing about preparing this rare delicacy is that you need to do nothing further than waiting if you have somehow managed the baby mice required to make the right quality baby mice wine. The process could be however painful since you need to drown the baby mice ( at a maximum of three days old) alive in a bottle of rice moonshine and the preparation is further left to be fermented for a period of about 12 to 14 months.

The process could is tedious and time consuming. It’s hence suggested to purchase baby mice wine if you are an enthusiast and wish to give it a shot.

Health Benefits

Surprisingly enough, the not so appreciated baby mice wine has several benefits related to health. In the earlier times, as it is said, the Korean villagers who used to be ill and were not financially qualified enough to consult a doctor used to consume this baby mice wine. Seeing the benefits in almost every variation of illness, the Koreans started to use the baby mice wine as an medicine against almost any sort of illness.

It has always been speculated by any that the baby mice wine can, indeed, cure several forms of illness including the ones as severe as asthma or even liver disorders. It has been ruled out by many experts, however, that the baby mice wine could guarantee a health recovery, yet several people still believe this drink to be a life saving remedy in cases of illness. With the health benefits at peak, and no side effects (except for your personal notions), this drink is a must try for all adventure food enthusiasts out there!

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